ef2000si oil question

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ef2000si oil question

kroman
Just got my brand new 2000is and iam confused about which oil to use .
No Yamaha dealer close so cant get yamalube 4 10w 40 which the book recomends.
The box says 10w 30.

What kind of oil do you guys use?? Do i just use 10w 30 or 40 from the auto section at store??
The kind you put in car? or does it have to be like 4 stroke motorcycle oil? I am confused.
Thanks
Synthetic or regular
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Re: ef2000si oil question

peter354
oil is oil 10-40 is 10-40 no matter whether its synthetic ,semi synthetic ,or normal the synthetic is more expensive. but breaks down less easier giving better wear protection .all depends how much you use geni
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Re: ef2000si oil question

Grumps
In reply to this post by kroman
Hi Kroman, as far as oil goes you will get a different opinion from everyone you ask. Most people just use a good quality 10w-30. If you have a Lowes or HomeDepot near you they both sell small engine oil. Myself I use the Briggs and Straton 30w in my EF2400. Here is a good post about engine break in from a few months ago. Do the break in and then change the oil!

     
   
       
 
     
   
 
(This post was updated on Aug 20, 2011; 08:11pm)
 If the 10 hour break-in was with no electrical load, it did not actually break-in the engine. That would generate a lot of blowby gasses and darken the oil. The rings need the higher cylinder pressures to push them against the cylinder bore and hone down the minute irregularities of both.

 Ideally a generator break-in should involve a 3 minute warm-up, then adding intermittent half power electrical loads increasing to a few minutes followed by less duration zero load run time for a cool down. Keep repeating the routine until you tire of doing it, then let the engine cool down to cold before repeating.
 4 or 5 heat cycles from cold engine start are required to cure the cast piston into it's final, cylinder bore formed shape. This is equivalent to the restrained/subdued riding of a motorcycle or driving a car for the first 600 miles. Cylinder bores are round, while pistons are irregular shaped until one sided combustion heat expands them into roundness. That's where the cylinder bore comes into play.

 An excellent article by the late Gordon Jennings explained the break-in concept in detail. He took new pistons, measured them precisely, then exposed them to several heat cycles in a low temperature oven as an engineers witty plan to break them in beforehand (race bike engine). What he found was that without the confines of the cylinder bore, they all became so dimensionally whacked out of shape they were unusable!! THAT's WHY manufacturers recommend taking it easy during the break-in, when the pistons are not yet cured until several heat cycles are attained.

 Power equipment engines have slightly greater running clearances than your car and usually no mention of a break-in is made by manufacturers. They even seem to survive being used at full power from the very first pullstart, like every power washer is subjected to. You cannot run them more than 2 minutes without pumping water or they overheat/damage the high pressure water pump. That does not mean you can't do the best for your genny by taking it easy at first. A very good reason to purchase your new genny BEFORE you actually NEED it.

I've just completed the human programmed electrical loading break-in routine on my new EF2000is (Aug 20, 2011) and it was fun. I used a 1,600/800 Watt (Hi/Low) small cube space heater to intermittently apply half and full load to the Genny with sufficient no-load cool downs in between loads. Did it from Eco-Idle and full RPM's to exercise all systems. At the very beginning it was only a few seconds of half power 800W loads and a half minute no-load cooldowns in between. It's as easy as turning the knob between Fan/Lo/Hi (12W/840W/1,640W says Kill-A-Watt) on the heater. The same routine was used intermittently and with increasingly heavier loads over a 2 week period until at least 4 hours and 6 heat cycles were attained. It's ready to go when needed. It got a really good break-in, that prolly 90% of Genny's never see.


 
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Re: ef2000si oil question

kroman
In reply to this post by kroman
Thanks for the info.
I put oil in today. Doesnt take much and was kind of messy for first time.
Genny started on first pull. I was amazed and this thing is so quiet.
I will start the break in process. i have an oil filled electric heater which should work good for this.
Thanks again
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Re: ef2000si oil question

CycleRob
In reply to this post by kroman
kroman, The temptation is to put a premium synthetic oil in it for the break-in, but you should NOT use a synthetic until the engine is broken in which is AFTER the 1st manufacturer recommended oil change time interval. If you use a Synthetic oil on day-1, it will delay/suspend the moving/rotating/sliding parts microscopic hone-in required for the break-in!

For regular petroleum oil the newer rated oils, alphabetically beyond "SH" (as in SJ, SL, SM) had friction modifier (AKA "reduction") ingredients progressively removed from the ingredients because they were found to coat-n-clog the catalyst medium, damaging it's function. That's the main reason to use the Yamalube recommended for power equipment. You can get SH rated oils in straight weight, like 30HD (HighDetergent) in auto parts and HomeDepot type stores and sometimes multigrade (10W-40) in MotorCycle oils for bikes without a catalytic converter (Harley).

 To fill my EF2000iS or EF1000iS I use a funnel with the Genny tipped away from me by way of a length of 2 x 4 stud for a 2" rise under the open side rubber feet. Then slowly add an amount of oil LESS THAN the specified amount so I can remove the empty funnel with a paper towel underneath to quickly transport it to the oil bottle's opening, then remove the wood piece and see how high the oil level advances up the threaded hole. From there, add the board and fill small amounts, removing the funnel-n-board for level rechecking each time. It takes longer than pouring and making a mess, but cleaning up that mess that goes in-n-under the motor outta' sight takes a lot longer and leaves behind a dust attractor and a "hot oil smell" when you open it up to drain the carb floatbowl. The funnel/board/papertowel trick doesn't spill a single drop, but you must be patient and use good judgement.
Talent, On Loan, From God  --Rush Limbaugh--
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Re: ef2000si oil question

yammyman75
In reply to this post by kroman
Im personally going to do the ride it like you stole it....Not only because ive done it with brand new motorcycles,,,my own zx6r...but because of this article.....When i got my brand new ninja 2007 zx6r...I rode it hard thru the gears,,,constantly shifting at first and then taking a nice long highway ride for an hour and half and all i did was cycle the rpms and gears...and my engine pulled just as hard at 10000 miles as it did day one...And it pulled thru the whole rpm range...with great mid end torque as it was designed to have...

More people dont follow the break in period by accident and end up with perfectly good bikes,lawn mowers,and cars....plus i know a mechanic who rebuilds diesel engines and on the first run..they ride the engine out.....I have more reason to believe this method works because people follow engine breakins all the time and still have problems....and it makes more sense that todays newer engine builds are made significantly better with closer tolerances than before...When i was a younger guy...new york city car engines needed tune ups by 60k miles...Todays engines dont get first tune up till 100k and up...I think the best way to break any new modern engine is to ride that bitch and cycle the rpms so its not constantly at one frequency vibration....in other words..ride hard thru the gears and dont stay on one gear or pattern too long...SO im gonna break my engine in using full throttle..full load...on and off at maybe one minute intervals at first,,then 5 minute then 10minute then 30 up to one hour.....rinse repeat....
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